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Wednesday, July 27, 2016

WELCOME

John Kay is one of Britain’s leading economists.  His interests focus on the relationships between economics and business.  His career has spanned academic work and think tanks, business schools, company directorships, consultancies and investment companies.

From 1 July, John’s weekly column will no longer be appearing in the Financial Times.  He will, however, continue to write frequently, and with the same witty and authoritative style that has won a wide following for his columns.  His articles will, however, be appearing in a wider variety of print and online sources, and may be shorter or longer than the 650 limit imposed by a newspaper column.

The best way to continue to follow John’s writing is via this website www.johnkay.com.  There will be new material every week, and this will either be on the site or accessible via a link from it.  You can receive a Twitter feed or email link to such new material in the ‘stay connected’ section.

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LATEST NEWS

What is the value to the economy of the finance and...

On July 6th, at Gresham College, John took part in a debate on the theme: "What is the value of finance and insurance to...

RECENT ARTICLES

BREXIT

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FUTURE OF FINANCE

The problems at Deutsche Bank

Deutsche bank’s share price has fallen by more than half in the last year. For some insight into the background see these two extracts...

QUANTITATIVE EASING

Yet another way we are cheating our grandchildren

Long term real interest rates are negative in Britain and in the Eurozone and barely positive in the United States. The impact on pension funding is dramatic.

Quantitative easing: The debate that never happened

On June 29th, John attended a launch event for the launch of a paper by Radix, a new think tank of the radical centre, on "Quantitive easing: The debate that never happened". This is the his foreword introducing the fundamental issues on both the effectiveness and legitimacy of quantitative easing.

The fallacy of helicopter money

The term “helicopter money” is derived from a vivid image created by the US economist Milton Friedman in which a central banker showers notes on a grateful populace. More recently, the notion has been promoted by Adair Turner, the former chairman of the UK financial regulator, in his book, Between Debt and the Devil .